Tuesday, October 29, 2013

What a Waste!

I love fresh figs.  It's one of the foods I only discovered living in Israel.  In New York figs were dry and old. Yes, they were sweet, too.  I've always loved dried fruit, but I never knew that you could eat figs fresh and juicy.  When we were new to Israel the only way to buy them was from Arab women.  Yes, that's what we'd do, OK, on rare occasions.

Since my daughter moved to Ofra ten years ago, I discovered that there are a lot of fig trees on the way to her house.  When I walk by them I check for ripeness and pick and eat them when in season.  Most of the time they are too hard.  The few ripe ones I eat are absolutely delicious. That season has just ended.  Last time I walked by the ground and path were littered with over-ripe, dirty figs.  The few that remained on the trees were inedible.



I wanted to cry.  It's not fair.  What a waste.

6 comments:

Miriam-Feyga Bunimovich said...

after making an Aliyah, me too, I was mad on fresh figs. sooner I discovered that because of insects they can't be eaten as they are. only when crushed with a blender...
so... I haven't had fresh figs for 2 years...

Glan Deas said...

Nothing is impossible. Some thing wants more efforts.

Regards,
Kopi Luwak

Leora said...

I like fresh figs, too, but when we get them fresh in NJ, they grew somewhere else.

Yesterday my daughter asked me what I buy at the farmers market. I answered squash, kale, green beans, apples. She asked if I could buy mangoes. I said, mangoes don't grow in New Jersey. You have to adjust to the produce of your area if you want to eat local. And when we go apple picking, yes, there are tons on the ground that go rotten.

Batya said...

Miriam, yes they must be checked, but not with a microscope.
Glan, yes
Leora, Every farmers market depends on location. Mangos, hmmm

goyisherebbe said...

If they can grow bug-free lettuce, why can't they make a bug-free fig orchard?

Batya said...

goyish, along with the strawberries?