Monday, December 18, 2017

Why Do I "Crave" Persimmons?

Persimmons are one of the foods, like avocados and artichokes, that not only had I never eaten before moving to Israel, but I had never even heard of. Actually I can make a very long list of foods in that category. Another would be a pomegranate. I really don't remember them from New York. Last year they were my "craved fruit." This year, I really can't make myself eat them

This is the year of the persimmon. But what has me stymied is what vitamin or mineral is in that pretty orange fruit that my body is demanding?

Wikipedia gives two different nutrition charts. I'm not sure which type of persimmon they have here in Israel. It may even be different from the two they list.

American persimmons, raw
Diospyros virginiana
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy531 kJ (127 kcal)
33.5 g
Sugarsn/a
Dietary fibern/a
0.4 g
0.8 g
Vitamins
Vitamin C
(80%)
66 mg
Minerals
Calcium
(3%)
27 mg
Iron
(19%)
2.5 mg
Phosphorus
(4%)
26 mg
Potassium
(7%)
310 mg
Sodium
(0%)
1 mg



Japanese persimmons, raw
Diospyros kaki
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy293 kJ (70 kcal)
18.59 g
Sugars12.53 g
Dietary fiber3.6 g
0.19 g
0.58 g
Vitamins
Vitamin A equiv.
(10%)
81 μg
(2%)
253 μg
834 μg
Thiamine (B1)
(3%)
0.03 mg
Riboflavin (B2)
(2%)
0.02 mg
Niacin (B3)
(1%)
0.1 mg
Vitamin B6
(8%)
0.1 mg
Folate (B9)
(2%)
8 μg
Choline
(2%)
7.6 mg
Vitamin C
(9%)
7.5 mg
Vitamin E
(5%)
0.73 mg
Vitamin K
(2%)
2.6 μg
Minerals
Calcium
(1%)
8 mg
Iron
(1%)
0.15 mg
Magnesium
(3%)
9 mg
Manganese
(17%)
0.355 mg
Phosphorus
(2%)
17 mg
Potassium
(3%)
161 mg
Sodium
(0%)
1 mg
Zinc
(1%)
0.11 mg


In all honesty, it's a pretty tame craving and a lot healthier than chocolate, roasted nuts or ice cream.

What do you think?


3 comments:

Ruti Mizrachi said...

Persimmon is a fascinating little fruit, and one of which I am also quite fond. I am aware of two types, both of which originated in Japan (though they are grown now in America, after having been brought from Japan in the late 19th century). According to The Wellness Encyclopedia of Food and Nutrition (1992), there are two types: astringent and non-astringent. When unripened, the astringent is nearly inedible. Once fully ripe (about the consistency of pudding), it is as delicious as its non-astringent cousin. Both are high in Vitamin C, beta carotene, and potassium. The Hachiya is astringent; the Fuyu is non-astringent. We have mostly seen the friendly Fuyu in our makolet, though we recently got the Hachiya; and I'm glad I had this knowledge before just biting into one! I heard a rumor when we first made aliyah that you should eat no more than one a day for health reasons, but I have never had that verified.

Batya Medad said...

Ruti, thanks for the information. I can't really tell them apart, even though the chart has very different calorie and other nutritional differences between them. I don't eat more than two or three a day, because I try to limit my fruit, in general, to three. I also make sure they're a bit soft, since it is said that unripe ones can be difficult to digest. Since I've been eating the persimmons, I have no cravings at all for oranges. That could be because of possibly similar Vitamin C and sugar content.

Ruti Mizrachi said...

I think you're right about what causes the cravings.

The astringent Hachiya are taller and larger. (And you'd know 'em if you bit into one before it was mushy: you'd totally pucker up from the bitterness!) The non-astringent Fuyu is smaller and flatter, and delicious, even when firm.